Precarious Work Affects Us All!


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Since the 1970s, Canada has seen a steady rise in precarious employment, work that is temporary, contract-based, overseen by temp agencies or jobs that are involuntarily part-time. In the last decade, precarious work has accelerated. These jobs are characterized by low wages, unstable work hours, few (if any) benefits, insecurity and contribute negatively to the quality of life for many.

Since the recession, the number of part-time and temporary jobs have dramatically increased. Today, nearly 20 per cent of Canadians (19.4) work part-time and among them, for one fifth of workers -it's involuntary. They simply cannot find a full-time job.

Emerging from the recent recession, Canada has experienced what many now refer to as a "bad jobs" recovery. With the country's economic health again in question, Canada cannot afford to backfill lost full-time, permanent good jobs with temporary part-time employment.

We need a good jobs strategy!

For years now trade unions around the globe have rallied, demonstrated, organized, discussed and strategized about the need to push for the creation of good, full-time, permanent, safe, fairly-compensated jobs where workers have a real voice in the workplace. Every October, we recognize this struggle through the World Day for Decent Work, organized by the International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC).

The World Day for Decent Work is intended to raise awareness of the growth of these inadequate jobs at a time of incredible economic turbulence. Workers around the world are demanding change and are holding their governments accountable for the quality of jobs created in a post-recession economy, not just the quantity of jobs. The time to protect and promote good jobs is now!

Find out what people are saying about precarious work in Canada!

Do you work in a precarious job? Share your story with us. It may be posted on the CAW website and used as part of a longer term campaign against precarious work.* Send your story, photos or videos to: cawcomm@caw.ca

*Individuals will be contacted prior to any stories being shared publicly for the campaign in order to ensure privacy and confidentiality.